Tag Archives: flora

White on white – Flora photography

Flora photography is usually all about color, but there is something really special about the “white on white” color combination and when we see this kind of images in the student’s gallery of our of our PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA class – they are always our favorites. White flowers on white background images just feel so nice, airy and soft even ethereal we could say and yet so eye catching and powerful.

But this color combination is an exposure challenge too. Too much white will always fool the light meter in your camera and final results will usually turn out underexposed and greyish. The reason is that the meter is designed to read the light from middle (grey) tones which means your camera will give you a combination of aperture and shutter speed that leads to slightly underexposed final images and obviously that is not what we want.

The easiest way to handle this situation is to use exposure compensation – simply said to intentionally overexpose a little. How much to do that depends on your scene but usually 2/3 EV or even 1 EV. This will compensate for camera reading and underexposing and give you correctly exposed shots. However, at the same time while doing it, you need to be careful to have white subject really white but not overexposed otherwise your highlights become just blown out without any detail or texture. Always check your camera display if your exposure looks good and if not (too dark or too bright), make accurate changes. Do not rely on post processing adjustments – the more proper results you can get directly out of the camera the better… Plus, guys, this is FLORA photography we are talking about – time to take your “me” time, relax and enjoy!

Are you interested in how our students managed to capture those extremely challenging exposure situations? Is it so complicated or we are just exaggerating? Well, let us demonstrate what we really mean by “white on white” when photographing flowers, with several outstanding examples taken during our previous PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA classes… The results can be so beautiful, what do you think?

And what do our students have to say?

Thank you Patrik and Monika for a fantastic critique of my images. I did learn a lot and thank you very much as I did enjoy the class. Especially being able to interact with my classmates which really enhanced the experience.
Louise Reeves (class of June 2021)

Patrik and Monika – I just wanted to say thanks for all the great ideas.  I haven’t had time to try all of them, but they will keep me busy for quite awhile.  I have really enjoyed this class.
Bob (class of June 2021)

Patrik and Monika – just wonderful instructors and lessons are just plain ole awesome!
Louise (class of June 2021)

I truly enjoyed this course. It got me outside to shoot and to think about flora. The lessons were fabulous. The class photo were beautiful I would recommend this course to anyone interested in flowers and flora. Thank You, Patrik and Monika!
Martha Rumley (class of July 2020)

 

PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA class begins October 1st, please join us here and enjoy photographing this amazing subject with us!

We are looking forward to meeting you in class!

Patrik and Monika

Michele Baxley

 

Donna Sturla

 

Zuzana Novotna

 

Pam Corckran

 

Sarka Drapakova

 

Michaela Nesvadbova

 

Lucie Portesova

 

Louise Reeves

 

Karen Partridge

 

Linda Wolk

 

Darja Nezvalova

 

Laura Russomano

 

Jodi Fredericksen

 

Iva Ullrichova

 

Dave H

 

Darja Nezvalova

 

Andrea Zapotocka

 

White background in the Flora photography

We love sharing the best work of our PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA students. In this class we talk a lot about the importance of the background and how a bad background can steal the thunder of your main subject in the photo! And while we definitely encourage our students to experiment and explore different backgrounds, we also find ourselves enjoying pictures with the most simple background possible – just pure white color. White is about simplicity, about cleanliness, virginity, purity… But above all – about NOT taking the focus from the main model!

There are several ways to achieve a nice white background.

  • Obviously, the very basic one is to use just a white, well background – for example paper, cloth, or even a shirt… But this might get a little bit tricky when you are photographing with available ambient light as you will need to minimize the presence of shadows
  • You can use your electronic flashes or softboxes. Our favorite way to use the flash is to photograph together with white opaque plexiglass sheets.
  • Another way is to tape your subject onto the window and photograph flora against the strong outdoor light. You would be surprised how a nice and simple white background can be created by playing with the exposure!

All methods above (and so many more!) we are covering in our class and our participants are sharing beautiful images with us. So do not take only our words for it and let us illustrate what we really mean by “Flora on white background”, with several outstanding examples, taken during our previous Flora classes…

 

And what do our students have to say about Photographing Flora class?

I truly enjoyed this course. It got me outside to shoot and to think about flora. The lessons were fabulous. The class photos were beautiful I would recommend this course to anyone interested in flowers and  flora. Thank you, Patrik and Monika
Martha Rumley 

Thank you for a wonderful and inspiring class. With your encouragement I have been able to play and experiment and be creative with my flower photography. I truly appreciate the lessons and the excellent critiques.
Pam Corckran

This has been an eye-opening class.  Watching critiques has been invaluable, with his kind encouragement and clear guidance for improvement.  I hear Patrik’s voice in my head sometimes now when I take photos now! I also learned a lot and gained inspiration from my classmates. I will probably take it again.
Mika Geiger

Thank you, Monika and Patrik. Your style of teaching is so much fun and enjoyable. There are lots of things to learn but not enough time to do it! I wish you can change it to 6 weeks! Your video critiques are most helpful. I learned quite a few techniques from your suggestions by listening to your critiques from my classmate’s works.
Vangie

 

PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA class begins September 4th, please join us here and learn how to photograph Flora too.

We are looking forward to meeting you in class!

Patrik and Monika Banas

 

© Alyda Gilmore

 

© Maureen Rogers

 

© Tomas Feller

 

© Beverly Burke

 

© Maria Sevecova

 

© Kveta Trckova

 

© Maureen Rogers

 

© Beverly Burke

 

 

© Francine Sreca

 

© Jacqui Nye

 

 

Let’s go BLUE!

We continue sharing the best work of our PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA students. Last time we were presenting green color, which is very common in the nature.

But today let’s have a look on much less common color in Flora world – and that is a color BLUE! Just for fun – try to close your eyes and think about all the blue flowers you know…

Done? What you got? Two, three? Iris? Hyacint? Well, if you would start exploring online, you might be surprised how many there are in blue.

Nevertheless, blue IS the rarest flower color, seen on only 10 percent of the 280,000 flowering plants on Earth. This has to do with the fact that there is no blue pigment in the plant kingdom and colors that appear to be blue are actually permutations of violet or purple.

And that’s why we are always so positively surprised by plethora of amazing assignments in blue color taken by our students in PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA classes – that’s why we would like to share them with you!

 

And what do our students say about Photographing Flora class?

I really like the way you teach.  I learn so much from your critiques and have watched all of them.  You are a great educators.  I am looking forward to the next class.
Leslie Hammond

Thanks Monika & Patrik. Great class! Learned quite a lot from your extensive workshop materials, and challenging assignments. My floral photography endeavors will continue to improve.
Jay Salzman

I enjoyed experimenting with all these techniques! Wonderful class! Thank you!
Anna Blatterman

I’ve enjoyed this class and cannot believe four weeks have gone by! Over the course of the month I’ve tried many of the techniques! Thank you so much. Focusing on flowers and photography has helped divert attention from world problems and the disruption of life.
Glenda G

 

PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA class begins July 3rd, please join us here and learn how to photograph Flora too (and not only in blue color 😉 ).

We are looking forward to meeting you in class!

Patrik and Monika Banas

Disclaimer: We are big St. Louis Blues fans – so our love towards blue is biased 😉


 

Jana Jezkova

 

Heather Sugioka

 

Holly Middagh

 

Lynn Riding

 

Michaela Nesvadbova

 

Tomas Feller

 

K. Leslie Hammond

 

Mariel W

 

Darja Nezvalova

 

Darja Nezvalova

 

Charlie

 


 

Mrs. Green in Flora Photography

Colors are very important in every aspect of photography and Flora is absolutely no exception! However, there is one color in Flora which seems to be overlooked, mostly because of its abundance. And that is Mrs. GREEN.

Green is not even a “real color”, it is the color between blue and yellow, so in fact – as you might remember from your school art classes – you can easily create it by combining yellow and blue ;-). By far the largest contributor to green in nature is chlorophyll, the chemical by which plants photosynthesize and convert sunlight into chemical energy. Many creatures have adapted to their green environments by taking on a green hue themselves as camouflage (hello frogs, hello crocodiles!)

So yes, the majority of Flora is in green thanks to chlorophyll. Leaves, stems, grass, trees – there is so much green, than we tend to focus on other, more rare colors in Flora and we are hunting for every other color BUT green. That’s why Flora is often associated with colorful flowers. But that is totally unfair to the green color, and the rest of Flora and it is also a missed opportunity because the green parts of Flora are so beautiful.

And that’s why we are always mesmerized by the work of our students, when they are sharing assignments in green. Green parts of Flora are the best to showcase elements of design, particularly lines and patterns. To showcase how green Flora images are stunning, we have put together some examples taken by our students in the recent PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA classes.

 

And what do our students say about Photographing Flora class?

This has been an eye-opening class.  Watching Patrik’s critiques has been invaluable, with his kind encouragement and clear guidance for improvement.  I hear his voice in my head sometimes now when I take photos now! I also learned a lot and gained inspiration from my classmates. I will probably take it again.
Mika Geiger

Thank you Monika and Patrik for a wonderful and inspiring class. With your encouragement I have been able to play and experiment and be creative with my flower photography. I truly appreciate the lessons and the excellent critiques.
Pam Corckran
Thank you, Monika and Patrik. Your style of teaching is so much fun and enjoyable. There are lots of things to learn but not enough time to do it! I wish you can change it to 6 weeks! Your video critiques are most helpful. I learned quite a few techniques from your suggestions by listening to your critiques from my classmate’s works.
Vangie
Thank you for a great class Monika and Patrik. So many techniques it could easily be an 8 week course. I plan to continue working on many of the ideas you gave us.
Doreen

 

PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA class begins in June 5th, please join us here and learn how to photograph flora too (and not only in green color ;-).

We are looking forward to meeting you in class!

Patrik and Monika Banas


iva-ullrichova_Photographing-Flora-Green

Iva Ullrichova

 

Ann Fitzsimmons_Photographing-Flora-Green

Ann Fitzsimmons

 

Patricia Daley_Photographing-Flora-Green

Patricia Daley

 

William Basta_Photographing-Flora-Green

William Basta

 

Pam Corckran_Photographing-Flora-Green

Pam Corckran

 

vlastimil-babicky_Photographing-Flora-Green

Vlastimil Babický

 

TerrieH_Photographing-Flora-Green

Terrie H

 

Sharon Davidson_Photographing-Flora-Green

Sharon Davidson

 

Patricia Daley2_Photographing-Flora-Green

Patricia Daley

 

MaryJBeck_Photographing-Flora-Green

Mary J Beck

Dina Damon_Photographing-Flora-Green

Dina Damon

Flora in Monochromatic (Best of student’s work)

Monochromatic images are very powerful, so it is not a surprise that monochromatic flower images look even more amazing!

How to take monochromatic flora pictures? There are two simple ways:

1) get closer and fill your frame only with that one particular flower or its petals only

2) work on your background and use the color matching your flower. And by matching we mean the same color or a very similar tone/hue/shade of that color

Simple right? 😉

If you are not sure what monochromatic means – here’s a short recap. Monochromatic comes from the Greek word monos meaning one, and khroma meaning color.

Student’s pictures explain the monochromatic topic the best. We are inviting you to see som examples in the gallery below, how our dear students from previous PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA classes created beautiful monochromatic images.  Such images are really impressive!

 

And what do our students say about Photographing Flora class?

I enjoyed experimenting with all these techniques! Wonderful class! Thank you!
Anna Blatterman 

Thanks Monika & Patrik. Great class! Learned quite a lot from your extensive workshop materials, and challenging assignments. My floral photography endeavors will continue to improve.
Jay Salzman

I find that watching video critiques of everyone’s photos is so valuable. You explain things very well, Patrik! This is a fantastic class and I’m learning so much from everyone in it.
Mika Geiger 

 

PHOTOGRAPHING FLORA class begins in May 1st, please join us here and learn how to photograph flora (and monochromatic) shots too.

 

We are looking forward to meeting you in class!

Patrik and Monika Banas


Vangie Killalea

 

Jan Cafaro

 

Francine Sreca

 

Patricia Daley

 

Holly Middagh

 

Julie Hammond

 

Doreen Weekley

 

Holly Middagh

 

Judith Roberson

 

Maureen Rogers

 

Jay Salzman

.

Ann Fitzsimmons

 

Pam Corckran

 

Larry

 

Sunny Marker

 

Sarah Herman

 

Leann Stella

 

 

Lynn Riding

 

Debbie Lieske

 

Charlie

 

Judith Roberson

 

 

 

  • I just wanted to provide feedback about the Luminar Essentials class and the instructor Jon Canfield. I felt that this class was very well put together and Jon was an excellent instructor. The videos were very thorough and Jon explained how to use each function within Luminar. This was an excellent class for a beginning editor and I learned a lot from Jon. I would love to take an advanced class in Luminar with Jon or a beginners class in photoshop with Jon if they were available. I never thought that I would enjoy editing my photos but this class has made editing fun. I have enjoyed all of the classes that I have taken at BPSOP thus far but the Luminar Essentials class has definitely been my favorite! Read More
    Sara Lieske Luminar Essentials
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